Nominate a Beautiful Hospital

by Tera Tuten on April 15, 2014

Soliant-FB-MBH-Nominate-ShareA hospital’s beauty goes beyond its looks. It extends to the quality of care it provides. So whether it is impeccable interior design or unmatched service that has impressed you, we want to know which hospitals are keeping you happy and why!

For the sixth year in a row, Soliant invites you to  help determine the Most Beautiful Hospitals in the U.S. Begin by submitting your nomination here. Once the nominees are announced in just a few weeks’ time, you will be able to vote on your picks.

To see past years’ Beautiful Hospitals, please visit http://www.mostbeautifulhospitals.com.

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Building Activities for Speech and Hearing Therapy

As we learned last week, play is the work of children. But if incorporating therapy into pretend play is a little outside of your comfort zone, there are other, more balanced ways to play and achieve therapy goals. These three examples of game modification may only be the tip of the iceberg, but it could give you some great ideas for other activities.

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How to Wade Through 200,000+ Nursing Job Postings

by Tera Tuten on April 1, 2014

On average, there are 5,000-6,000 nursing-related jobs posted on this site on any given day.

A recent study by Wanted Analytics found nursing to be the most in-demand job in America, with estimates of the number of U.S. nursing jobs open in a year reaching into the hundreds of thousands.

While Soliant adds the handy advantage of having access to a personal recruiter that can work with you on your job search, it’s also important for you to know who you are and what you want, in order to separate the job posting wheat from the chaff.

To that end, here are 5 tips for wading through one of the largest professions for job postings in the U.S.: [click to continue…]

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According to labor statistics, some nurses can make north of $100,000 a year. Meanwhile, according to the documentary “The Vanishing Oath,” a full-time physician in the U.S. can take home as little as $28/hr before taxes.

These are two extremes, but it brings up an interesting topic I’ve been thinking about for a while now: How much does the pay you get out of a medical job actually give you?

We often hear of 60, 70, even 80-hour work-weeks debasing the currency of some medical salaries, while overall satisfaction for other healthcare jobs is among the highest in any industry…So what does it all work out to when it comes to the quality-of-life your job lets you have?

To find out, I did some basic math with the most recent available salary, hourly pay, average weekly hours worked, and overtime data, as well as average time needed to complete training, job satisfaction, and other elements from a variety of sources.

The results were surprising, on several levels: [click to continue…]

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Nurses (including RNs)

By 2020, the U.S. government predicts a shortage of between 800,000 and one million nurses. (Close to 117,000 short in California alone.)

Before that – 2015 – the U.S. Department of Health projects that 400,000 new nurses will be needed just to fill vacancies left by retirees.

Here’s a closer look at the need, from a blog posting we did in 2009. Since then, 2012 Labor statistics project that at least 580,000 new nursing jobs will be generated in the U.S. just by 2016. And that’s just the jobs that will be generated, not the total needed to fulfill healthcare goals. [click to continue…]

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A recent New York Times article entitled “In Hawaii’s health system, lessons for lawmakers” opens with a story of a Honolulu employee at a U.S.-based ice-cream chain who has health insurance through that chain.

While the chain typically doesn’t offer health insurance to its employees on the mainland, it has to do so in the “Aloha state” due to health industry regulations there.

Hawaii makes your employer guarantee you health coverage

Hawaii was the first state to mandate what is effectively universal healthcare for every person who works, and their families…and they did it all the way back in 1974.

And like a dream-version of those no-medical-exam insurance ads on TV, no one can be denied coverage. It’s state law.

While they were at it, state legislators mandated clearly-defined boundaries to force competing insurers to keep costs under control. [click to continue…]

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