Top-Paying Healthcare Jobs that Don’t Require Med School

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Soliant-top-jobs-no-med-schoolAccording to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the median four-year cost to attend med school is close to a quarter of a million dollars.

And while a growing doctor shortage is keeping med school attractive despite the high cost and long years of training, there are many healthcare jobs that approach some physician salaries, without the extra years (and debt) associated with becoming a doctor.

Here’s a look at five high-paying medical jobs that you don’t have to go to med school for: Continue reading “Top-Paying Healthcare Jobs that Don’t Require Med School”

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Nursing Pay Rates, Explained

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Online lists stating the average pay for nurses nationwide can vary wildly and often suggest that huge rises or drop have occurred, but what’s the final word on how (and what) nurses actually get paid under various circumstances? We take a look at the most up-to-date numbers and what the statistics can – and can’t – tell us.

Continue reading “Nursing Pay Rates, Explained”

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17 Medical Salaries, Adjusted for ‘Quality-of-Living’

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According to labor statistics, some nurses can make north of $100,000 a year. Meanwhile, according to the documentary “The Vanishing Oath,” a full-time physician in the U.S. can take home as little as $28/hr before taxes.

These are two extremes, but it brings up an interesting topic I’ve been thinking about for a while now: How much does the pay you get out of a medical job actually give you?

We often hear of 60, 70, even 80-hour work-weeks debasing the currency of some medical salaries, while overall satisfaction for other healthcare jobs is among the highest in any industry…So what does it all work out to when it comes to the quality-of-life your job lets you have?

To find out, I did some basic math with the most recent available salary, hourly pay, average weekly hours worked, and overtime data, as well as average time needed to complete training, job satisfaction, and other elements from a variety of sources.

The results were surprising, on several levels: Continue reading “17 Medical Salaries, Adjusted for ‘Quality-of-Living’”

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A Closer Look at the Demand For Medical Employees

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Over the last few months, we’ve looked at the nursing and overall medical staff shortage – perhaps one of the most complex issues in the U.S. medical community.

And while we’ve looked at why the shortage exists and specific states where staff are in demand, we haven’t (until now) looked closely at the demand itself.

Will there really be more of a demand?

Assuming president Obama’s healthcare reform measures kick-in at the beginning of 2014, there will be an Obamacare-based effect, but not the skyrocket in demand some are predicting:

Because Medicare already covers pretty much everyone 65 and older, most of the estimated 32 million Americans who will become covered under the new healthcare reforms by 2014 are younger people (who typically don’t need anywhere near as many healthcare services as seniors.) Continue reading “A Closer Look at the Demand For Medical Employees”

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Winning the Battle to Work the Hours You Were Hired For

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UK labour group workSMART recently celebrated the 10th annual “Work Your Proper Hours Day” which they encourage everyone on Earth to observe every 24th of February. That’s the date by which the average person would be done working for free if they put in all their unpaid overtime hours at once. Continue reading “Winning the Battle to Work the Hours You Were Hired For”

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The Most Technologically Advanced Schools in America

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While you can’t actually “buy” progress, and infrastructure alone can’t create innovation, having a technologically advanced research base with ample facilities can definitely help facilitate breakthroughs.

With that in mind, here’s a spotlight on some of the most technologically-advanced schools for – or including – medical research, in four key categories:
Continue reading “The Most Technologically Advanced Schools in America”

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