Nursing Pay Rates, Explained

 on

Online lists stating the average pay for nurses nationwide can vary wildly and often suggest that huge rises or drop have occurred, but what’s the final word on how (and what) nurses actually get paid under various circumstances? We take a look at the most up-to-date numbers and what the statistics can – and can’t – tell us.

Continue reading “Nursing Pay Rates, Explained”

0

“Why we didn’t hire you”: What Not to Do in Nursing Job Interviews

 on

Soliant-blog---why-we-didn't-hire-you“I remember one nurse whose clothes were so tight, I felt like I was watching her slowly suffocate during the interview,” says one hospital HR recruiter.

“I had a gal come to an interview with an itty-bitty dog in her purse,” says another.

“Please don’t start off the interview with a litany of things you won’t do…such as work nights, touch poop or look at old people,” says one more.

A totally different senior RN tasked with hiring says “do we really have to say some of these things?”

According to anecdotal evidence, the answer to that question would seem to be “yes.”

Don’t be one of those anecdotes…

…And while you’re at it, take a look at some more common reasons that clinic or hospital may not have hired you as their next nurse: Continue reading ““Why we didn’t hire you”: What Not to Do in Nursing Job Interviews”

0

Healthcare Jobs That Will Be Most in Demand 2020 – 2025

 on

Nurses (including RNs)

By 2020, the U.S. government predicts a shortage of between 800,000 and one million nurses. (Close to 117,000 short in California alone.)

Before that – 2015 – the U.S. Department of Health projects that 400,000 new nurses will be needed just to fill vacancies left by retirees.

Here’s a closer look at the need, from a blog posting we did in 2009. Since then, 2012 Labor statistics project that at least 580,000 new nursing jobs will be generated in the U.S. just by 2016. And that’s just the jobs that will be generated, not the total needed to fulfill healthcare goals. Continue reading “Healthcare Jobs That Will Be Most in Demand 2020 – 2025”

1+

Should Nurses Be Unionized?

 on

Soliant Nurses Discussion UnionsAccording to the Washington DC-based Department for Professional Employees union coalition, 18 percent of RNs and 10 percent of LPNs and LVNs in the U.S. are union members.

What’s more, unionized nurses can earn an average of $200-$400 more per week than non-unionized nurses.

So why not join a union? It turns out, doing so is a more complex (and personal) issue than just signing up and cashing-in on the extra pay (if applicable) and other benefits – real or perceived.

Here’s a quick look at some of the upsides and pitfalls of having such representation: Continue reading “Should Nurses Be Unionized?”

0

A Nursing Memo to You …From 1860

 on

Ever wonder – between the working conditions, technology, and knowledge of medical science – if there was ever anything good about the ‘good ol’ days’ of nursing?

Despite a lack of regulation, sanitary conditions, and other drawbacks, the early days (and I mean really early days) of nursing might be able to teach us a lesson or two when it comes to the present day.
For example: Continue reading “A Nursing Memo to You …From 1860”

0

10 Traits of Highly Effective Nurse Administrators

 on

Nurse Administrators

Nursing school can lead to hundreds of different types jobs and dozens of careers, including the challenging and higher-paying ($60,000 for entry-level head-nurse jobs to more than $150,000 for executive manager positions) avenue of nursing administration.

Most new nurse administrators begin as department managers or staff supervisors and can seek to work-up to becoming department heads or assistant administrators.

Eventually, such professionals may even become administrators or chief executive officer of a facility.

Sure he or she needs to be a confident and decisive communicator, organizer, and consensus-builder with a vast knowledge of nursing science and professional nursing in-practice.

But there’s more.

Whether you’re looking to go through college at the graduate level in hopes of becoming a nurse administrator or looking to do so through retraining, here below are a few traits to aspire to. Continue reading “10 Traits of Highly Effective Nurse Administrators”

1+