Nursing Pay By State

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A Registered Nurse

Online lists stating the average pay for nurses nationwide can vary wildly and often suggest that huge rises or drop have occurred, but what’s the final word on how (and what) nurses actually get paid under various circumstances? We take a look at the most up-to-date numbers and what the statistics can – and can’t – tell us.

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Five Reasons Why New Nurses Can’t Find a Job

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soliant_hard_to_get_nursing_jobsLast year, 200 healthcare HR managers were surveyed about the nurses they aimed to hire.

24% of those surveyed complained that applicants “don’t have any relevant work experience.” Among managers currently hiring nurses, 41% said they were only interested in experienced nurses, not new grads.

What’s more, 22% said they were “only interested in applicants with specialized training.”

The experience and specialty problems seem to be just two of many hiring conundrums for new nurses. Here are some more (and what you can do about them): Continue reading “Five Reasons Why New Nurses Can’t Find a Job”

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5 Ways We Can Cope With a 90,000-Doctor Shortage by 2020

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Soliant-2020-doctor-shortageThe American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) estimates that within the next six years, the U.S. will face a shortage of more than 90,000 physicians.

What’s more, that figure is expected to climb to 130,000 by 2025.

Here’s a look at five ways we might be able to cope with 90,000 fewer MDs than we thought we needed in the next few years:

1. Use remote medicine

Telehealth (or telemedicine) is being touted as one potential means of coping with the expected physician shortage.

Health monitoring equipment with web-based applications allows people to receive care from the comfort of their own homes, reducing doctor visits and patient expenses by linking people in remote areas to doctors in larger centers.

This can cut travel time and costs for patients by up to 58%, according to a study published in Telemedicine Journal and e-Health. Continue reading “5 Ways We Can Cope With a 90,000-Doctor Shortage by 2020”

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17 Medical Salaries, Adjusted for ‘Quality-of-Living’

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According to labor statistics, some nurses can make north of $100,000 a year. Meanwhile, according to the documentary “The Vanishing Oath,” a full-time physician in the U.S. can take home as little as $28/hr before taxes.

These are two extremes, but it brings up an interesting topic I’ve been thinking about for a while now: How much does the pay you get out of a medical job actually give you?

We often hear of 60, 70, even 80-hour work-weeks debasing the currency of some medical salaries, while overall satisfaction for other healthcare jobs is among the highest in any industry…So what does it all work out to when it comes to the quality-of-life your job lets you have?

To find out, I did some basic math with the most recent available salary, hourly pay, average weekly hours worked, and overtime data, as well as average time needed to complete training, job satisfaction, and other elements from a variety of sources.

The results were surprising, on several levels: Continue reading “17 Medical Salaries, Adjusted for ‘Quality-of-Living’”

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Healthcare Jobs That Will Be Most in Demand 2020 – 2025

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Nurses (including RNs)

By 2020, the U.S. government predicts a shortage of between 800,000 and one million nurses. (Close to 117,000 short in California alone.)

Before that – 2015 – the U.S. Department of Health projects that 400,000 new nurses will be needed just to fill vacancies left by retirees.

Here’s a closer look at the need, from a blog posting we did in 2009. Since then, 2012 Labor statistics project that at least 580,000 new nursing jobs will be generated in the U.S. just by 2016. And that’s just the jobs that will be generated, not the total needed to fulfill healthcare goals. Continue reading “Healthcare Jobs That Will Be Most in Demand 2020 – 2025”

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