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Medical Technology Advances: Treatments of the Future















Healthcare and medicine are evolving at a remarkable rate. And, whilst some of the technological advances mentioned above may not be available for many years to come, or even in our lifetime, one of the next most effective and useful vaccines of our century could be waiting just around the corner. Click here to read what could be in store for us in the not-so-distant future.


know more link
  • Sources:
  • heliusmedical.com/divisions/neurohabilitation/pons-device
  • sciencealert.com/lab-grown-kidneys-shown-to-be-fully-functional-in-animal-recipients
  • 3dprintingindustry.com/news/12-things-we-can-3d-print-in-medicine-right-now-42867/
  • explorestemcells.co.uk/stem-cells-treat-blindness.html
  • howitworksdaily.com/smart-e-pants-the-electrical-underwear-that-prevents-bedsores/
  • smashingrobotics.com/complete-robotic-exoskeleton-suits-list-for-limb-movements/
  • austinpublishinggroup.com/biomedical-engineering/fulltext/ajbe-v1-id1012.php
  • genomemag.com/what-is-personalized-medicine/#.WD7yYeaLSUk
  • lonza.com/custom-manufacturing/chemical-manufacturing/antibody-drug-conjugates-adcs.aspx
  • advertisinghealth.co.uk/future-medicine-smartphone/
  • allaboutroboticsurgery.com/surgicalrobots.html
  • www.californiaearinstitute.com/ear-disorders-hair-cell-regeneration-research-california-ear-institute-bay-area.php

Medical Technology Advances: Treatments of the Future


Brain damage repair

The tongue is a fascinating and underrated organ, made up of intricate nerve fibers that help us to eat, swallow, and speak. While this may be stating the obvious, what most people won’t know is that the tongue acts as a direct gateway to the brain – and a non-invasive one, at that.

New technology, known as a Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator, or a PoNS, is a device that delivers zaps to the tongue’s surface in the hope of reducing neurological disorders, such as Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, and strokes. The idea behind the administered zaps is to stimulate precise nerve regions on the tongue, and in doing so, help the brain to focus on repairing the nerves that have been previously damaged.


Stem cells to treat blindness (eyes)

Scientists have discovered a technique for producing several vital types of eye tissue from human stem cells. They used the recent discovery to successfully restore vision in rabbits, and the findings offer hope that in years to come, blind people could be treated in a similar way to help restore their vision.

Hair cells regeneration

A significantly large proportion of acquired hearing loss is related to hair cell death. Once these cells in the human ear are damaged, they do not regrow. However, new research is looking to induce regeneration in damaged hair cells in the cochlea, restoring and improving a person’s ability to hear.

Efforts to regrow lost hair cells in the cochlea are focussed on two key areas: developing stem cell treatments that can be implanted into the inner ear in order to replace the missing cells, and developing treatments that will encourage the inner ear to regrow the missing cells, using the body’s natural regeneration process.

Growing organs in labs

According to the Network for Organ Sharing, someone is added to the national transplant list every 10 minutes, and, perhaps subsequently, 22 people die each day waiting for the right match. New technologies, however, might be able to restore the function of human organs or even replace them entirely.

Eventually, growing organs from a person’s stem cells may be the solution for transplant waiting lists. For example, nanofilters that act as an artificial kidney might soon replace dialysis. Although growing organs in Petri dishes may sound surreal, scientists have already successfully grown ears, liver cells and fallopian tubes.

The 3D printing revolution

Giving hope to people with lost limbs: 3D printers are not only being developed to create prosthetic arms and legs, but to manufacture health equipment and medicine. They’ll also play an important role in regenerative drugs to create tissues with blood vessels, heart valves, ear cartilage, bone, synthetic skin, and even full organs. With its cumulative affordability and open source engineering, the possibilities for 3D printing are incredibly huge and beneficial.

Artificial hearts

According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, over 4,000 people wait for a donor heart transplant on any given day. However, with up-and-coming advancements in bioengineering, these numbers could dramatically improve.

Total Artificial Hearts were invented over 60 years ago as a temporary solution for people waiting for heart transplants, however, the future promises to bring a more permanent solution for these patients, eliminating the need for heart transplants completely.

Electric underwear

When a patient is lying in a hospital bed for a prolonged period of time, they can develop what is known as bed sores. These open wounds are formed by a lack of circulation and compressed skin and, believe it or not, bed sores can be fatal. It is estimated that over 60,000 people die from bed sores every year, draining $12 billion from the U.S. medical industry.

This is where Smart-e-Pants come in: developed by Canadian researcher Sean Dukelow, the electric underpants deliver a small electrical shock every ten minutes. This stimulates the muscles in the same way movement does, and so increases circulation in the patient’s body, which in turn eradicates the problem of bed sores.

Hope for paraplegics

The development of exoskeleton suits has given partially paralyzed individuals hope to be able to walk again. Walking in, what is essentially a robotic suit, has been proven to increase the precision of motor control in the brain, which helps to recreate natural sensation in muscles again. Scientists believe this will eventually recreate communication between the prosthetic limb and the brain. One of the biggest challenges companies face is to design robotic devices that can flawlessly mimic the complex movements of legs, arms, hands and feet.

Tiny robots travelling in our bloodstream

Many years from now, robots on the nanoscale could be travelling inside of our bodies and circulating around our bloodstreams. In order to prevent diseases, the tiny devices will alert individuals when a condition or illness is about to develop, giving people the opportunity to have a more proactive approach to their health.

Genomics and tailored medicine

Examining a person’s DNA will become a standard protocol when prescribing patient’s medicine in the future. This will ensure that any treatment is personalized and correctly adjusted for that particular person’s biological makeup. This kind of specificity will make it possible to define disease in terms similar to GPS coordinates.

The analysis of our DNA will soon give us the power to make better decisions about our future. Personalized medicine will ensure we receive maximum effect from any medical treatment, as we’re only getting drugs that are designed for our unique genomic background.

Health sensors

Smartphones could soon be used as biosensors in coordination with wearable devices, enabling patients to monitor their health parameters themselves. This would mean that information and health variables would finally be available to a patient at home, rather than having to book a doctor’s appointment for every health check-up.

Surgical and humanoid robots

In the future, robotic-assisted operations will enhance the skill of a surgeon, create opportunities for less invasive surgeries, and offer precision beyond what a surgeon’s hand can achieve. Although robots may never fully replace a surgical team, they will become much more integrated into surgical procedures.

Say goodbye to chemotherapy

Since chemotherapy and radiation end up destroying healthy cells along with cancerous ones, scientists have been trying to find a less harmful way of battling the deadly disease. This where antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) come in. The drugs are a type of treatment which combines antibodies – which are the molecules in the body that help to fight viruses attacking the immune system – with a powerful toxin that can destroy cancer.


Healthcare and medicine are evolving at a remarkable rate. And, whilst some of the technological advances mentioned above may not be available for many years to come, or even in our lifetime, one of the next most effective and useful vaccines of our century could be waiting just around the corner. Click here to read what could be in store for us in the not-so-distant future.


know more link
  • Sources:
  • heliusmedical.com/divisions/neurohabilitation/pons-device
  • sciencealert.com/lab-grown-kidneys-shown-to-be-fully-functional-in-animal-recipients
  • 3dprintingindustry.com/news/12-things-we-can-3d-print-in-medicine-right-now-42867/
  • explorestemcells.co.uk/stem-cells-treat-blindness.html
  • howitworksdaily.com/smart-e-pants-the-electrical-underwear-that-prevents-bedsores/
  • smashingrobotics.com/complete-robotic-exoskeleton-suits-list-for-limb-movements/
  • austinpublishinggroup.com/biomedical-engineering/fulltext/ajbe-v1-id1012.php
  • genomemag.com/what-is-personalized-medicine/#.WD7yYeaLSUk
  • lonza.com/custom-manufacturing/chemical-manufacturing/antibody-drug-conjugates-adcs.aspx
  • advertisinghealth.co.uk/future-medicine-smartphone/
  • allaboutroboticsurgery.com/surgicalrobots.html
  • www.californiaearinstitute.com/ear-disorders-hair-cell-regeneration-research-california-ear-institute-bay-area.php