Posts tagged as:

per diem

  1. Excellent Benefits: Soliant travel allied health professionals have wonderful benefits, such as health insurance, dental and vision coverage, a matching 401(k) program, life insurance, reimbursement for continuing education and licensing fees, travel money, and many other things you’re probably not getting from your current job.
  1. Great pay: travel health professionals often earn significantly more than their stationary counterparts. If you are willing to work night shifts, overtime, weekends, and holidays, simply let your Soliant recruiter know and you will see a pretty attractive paycheck for your extended efforts. As you gain more experience working in different settings and roles. You’ll be able to command top dollar for learning an array of skills and expertise.
  1. Job Security: Travel allied health professionals have the advantage of working where and when they are needed. When you’re not needed anymore, you go somewhere else that needs you. With our vast network of resources and contacts, Soliant Health provides nursing jobs virtually anywhere in the U.S. The best part is that words like “downsizing”, “layoff”, or reorganization” will mean nothing to you. [click to continue…]


Benefits of Becoming a Per Diem Pharmacist

by Jennifer Bradford on February 11, 2010

Since I began writing on this blog, I’ve found much more to talk about with my local pharmacist. We discuss a variety of pharmacy topics when I go in to refill prescriptions several times a month. Before, it was the usual “how are you doing” kind of conversation, and now I use him as a source of inspiration and information. Recently, I was telling him about some of the blog posts I’d been writing and mentioned temporary nursing positions. I asked him if he knew about them, and he did. Then we started discussing about how the same type of arrangement is also available for pharmacists. He said it had never interested him much, because he likes where he lives, but that he’d known several people who enjoyed the variety. He had similar things to say about becoming a per diem pharmacist, and mentioned that their pharmacy employed them from time to time when someone was sick or was scheduled for vacation.


Oddly, I had never noticed if someone different was busily filling my prescriptions, but then again, I hadn’t really started having conversations with my pharmacist every visit until recently. I usually deal with the pharmacy technician or cashier unless I have a specific question about the medications. I must admit I was intrigued. I asked if he could tell me why people were interested in becoming a per diem pharmacist. Some of the answers reminded me of what nurses I know have to say and others seemed more specific to the world of pharmaceuticals. [click to continue…]



Is Per Diem Work Right for You?

by Jennifer Bradford on April 2, 2009

Per diem work provides a variety of pros and cons. Could your schedule use a change?

Have you ever considered working per diem? Many medical professionals work per diem to pick up some extra money in addition to their full time positions, but others choose to only work per diem shifts without having a full time job. [click to continue…]