Pros and Cons of Going Freelance as a Nurse

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soliant_freelance_nursingIn recent blogs, we’ve looked at the nursing shortage and – paradoxically – why it’s still hard to find a job as a newly-graduated nurse.

One solution to this could be to start working as a freelance nurse.

Whether it’s a way to break into the healthcare industry or a change of pace after years of full-time wok at a hospital or clinic, freelancing might be just the ticket for you.

Here are some of the plusses and minuses to a few aspects of freelance nursing:

Independent Contracting: Pros

An independent contractor, formerly known as a private duty nurse, can diagnose and treat a patient in the client’s home and is paid directly by the patient or a representative of the patient.

Nursing care must follow the nurse practice act of whichever state you’re working in, just like that provided by a staff nurse. (In some states, physician collaboration or supervision is required.)

The advantage here of being in business for yourself is that you set your own hours, charge a rate slightly above the amount a staff nurse would make, and your earnings are only limited by the number of hours you work in a day.  Continue reading “Pros and Cons of Going Freelance as a Nurse”

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Five Reasons Why New Nurses Can’t Find a Job

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soliant_hard_to_get_nursing_jobsLast year, 200 healthcare HR managers were surveyed about the nurses they aimed to hire.

24% of those surveyed complained that applicants “don’t have any relevant work experience.” Among managers currently hiring nurses, 41% said they were only interested in experienced nurses, not new grads.

What’s more, 22% said they were “only interested in applicants with specialized training.”

The experience and specialty problems seem to be just two of many hiring conundrums for new nurses. Here are some more (and what you can do about them): Continue reading “Five Reasons Why New Nurses Can’t Find a Job”

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Top 8 Cities for Travel Nurses (That You May End Up Moving To)

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Ever have a conversation with one of those people in a desirable locale, who say “I came for a week and stayed for a decade?”

Travel nursing affords you the opportunity to experience a large range of workplaces and the towns those workplaces exist in.

While it’s great to see the country (and the world), all that traveling might also lead you to a place you might like to stay in for a while.

Factoring in things like a city’s growth rate, cost of living, average RN salaries, commute time, employment/unemployment figures, and even selections from other “top cities for nurses” lists, we came up with the following faves: Continue reading “Top 8 Cities for Travel Nurses (That You May End Up Moving To)”

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A Look at the Nurse Practitioner Salary Explosion

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Soliant-blog-nurse-practitioner-salariesOver the last decade, the number of nurse practitioners working in the U.S. has exploded from an estimated 97,000 to more than 189,000.

According to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, these NPs are working in all areas of specialization.

Thanks to the triple-headed healthcare challenge that includes sweeping reforms, the looming doctor shortage of 2020 (and-beyond), and the skyrocketing medical needs of baby boomers, nurse practitioners are more in demand than ever: That’s good news if you’re already in this field and better news if you’re considering going into it. Continue reading “A Look at the Nurse Practitioner Salary Explosion”

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Should Nurses Be Unionized?

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According to the Washington DC-based Department for Professional Employees union coalition, 18 percent of RNs and 10 percent of LPNs and LVNs in the U.S. are union members.

What’s more, unionized nurses can earn an average of $200-$400 more per week than non-unionized nurses.

So why not join a union? It turns out, doing so is a more complex (and personal) issue than just signing up and cashing-in on the extra pay (if applicable) and other benefits – real or perceived.

Here’s a quick look at some of the upsides and pitfalls of having such representation: Continue reading “Should Nurses Be Unionized?”

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