From the category archives:

Miscellaneous

Celebrating Mothers and More

by Soliant Health on May 3, 2016

mothers day speech activitiesMay is here, and this means that it is time to think about Mother’s Day. This is the perfect opportunity to celebrate mothers and other special women in our lives. Think about each of your students and remember those who may not live with their mothers. Check in with their family members for suggestions on who they may be able to focus on. Ask all families to send in a photo of the special woman in their lives to be used during the speech and language project. [click to continue…]

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Celebrating National Deaf History Month

by Tera Tuten on March 23, 2016

national deaf history month

National Deaf History Month is March 13 – April 15.

This holiday celebrates key figures and events that have made significant improvements over the years for the for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

Today, school-based professionals like Teachers of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Sign Language Interpreters are carrying forward those very improvements within our classrooms.

Calling all Teachers of the Deaf/Hard of Hear and Sign Language Interpreters!

What’s your reason for teaching and/or interpreting? Share your story for a chance to win a $100 Visa gift card! Share your reasons by commenting below. It’s our small way of saying “thanks” for the big difference you make every single day.

Deaf History Month Share

We will be accepting entries from now until Friday, April 15, 2016.

Happy Deaf History Month from all of us at Soliant! 

 

 

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In our ‘Nursing Blog of the Month’ feature, every month we introduce a new blog that we enjoy reading and know you will too. This month we feature Brock Anderson from Mightynurse.com. 

Mighty Nurse is a support website which empowers nurses in a world that takes advantage of their unrelenting support for humanity, kindness and skills.

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Tell us a little bit about your background. What led you into nursing and how long have you been a nurse? I’ve always enjoyed helping people and what better way to help people than pursuing a career in Nursing?! I’ve been in the nursing industry for close to 10 years now.

What inspired you to start blogging?

The healthcare industry is always evolving and over the years I’ve witnessed a lot of changes in the technology space. I think that the healthcare industry was behind on modern technology for so many years, and it’s just now starting to play catch up. I first started blogging when I was in nursing school and realized that there were hardly any sites that empowered Nurses online. So I started blogging about anything and everything related to Nursing.

What can our readers expect to find on your blog? And is there anything they can get involved with?

Mightynurse.com is full of resources for Nurses and Nursing students. We even have stuff for retired Nurses! We have everything from personal nursing stories, to forums, to NCLEX prep material, to nurse cartoons and much more! Our website is a place for the entire nursing community so there‘s a lot for any Nurse to do to get involved on our site.  We encourage nurses to send us their personal stories (http://www.mightynurse.com/contribute-to-mighty-nurse/) and invite people to browse around our forum boards (http://www.mightynurse.com/ask-a-nurse-forums/)

How do you think the public perception of what nurses do compares to the reality of the job?

The view the media portrays of Nurses cracks me up. A majority of the time TV shows and movies are almost the exact opposite of what being a Nurse is actually like. Being a Nurse is tough work! It takes a lot of schooling and knowledge to obtain that Nursing license and I think the media often overlooks that.

Finally, is there one piece of advice you would give to a nurse at the start of their nursing career?

Just like anything in life, the start is always the hardest. There will be days when you second guess yourself and consider giving up. Every Nurse goes through that and you’re not alone. Just keep in the mind the end reward and make time to take care of yourself. I think Dory from Finding Nemo said it best “Just keep swimming, just keep swimming, just keep swimming.”

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In our ‘Nursing Blog of the Month’ feature, every month we introduce a new blog that we enjoy reading and know you will too.

This month we are pleased to feature Dr. Renee Thompson from RTConnections. After more than 20 years as a nurse, Renee took a leap of faith, quit her secure job as a nurse executive and started RTConnections.

Renee has since become one of the country’s leading authorities on nurse bullying, new nurse onboarding, effective communication and nursing culture.  Renee has been speaking in front of audiences at conferences and educational seminars for many years.

More information can be found at: https://rtconnections.com/

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Tell us a little bit about your background. What led you into nursing and how long have you been a nurse?

I’ve been a nurse for more than 25 years. I originally wanted to be a physician but then life got in the way. I got married young, had 2 beautiful daughters right away and realized that going to med school was not an option. So, I became a nurse and never looked back! I’ve worked as a clinical nurse, a nurse manager, educator, homecare nurse, nurse executive and now I own my own education company, RTConnections. In demand as a consultant and keynote speaker, I now help healthcare organizations eliminate workplace bullying, develop effective communication among teams, improve clinical competence through certification, and build positive and healthy workplaces. I speak internationally to healthcare organizations and academic institutions, teaching and motivating my audiences at conferences, training events, and seminars.

What inspired you to start blogging?

I started my blog as a way to help nurses who were dealing with bullying situations in the workplace.  60% of new nurses quit their first job within the first year due to the bad behaviour of their co-workers. 48% of newly graduating nurses are afraid that they will become the target of workplace bullying. And, almost every day of my life, a nurse reaches out to me for help. I just couldn’t sit back and say, “Well, that’s just the way it is in nursing.” I had to do something. Blogging gave me a forum to help the masses of nurses who are struggling.

What can our readers expect to find on your blog? And is there anything they can get involved with?

Readers can expect to find blog posts about nurse bullying and professional development. I share stories from my current experiences and examples that other nurses share with me. My goal is to offer nurses solutions to common professional issues we face; issues such as nurse bullying, conflict in the workplace, and other issues related to professional development.

They can get involved by commenting and sharing their favorite posts with their colleagues.

How do you think the public perception of what nurses do compares to the reality of the job?

The public has mixed perceptions of what nurses do. According to Grey’s Anatomy, we just put patients on bedpans or sleep around with doctors. According to Nurse Jackie, we are all drug users. Or, the public thinks that to be a nurse, you have to work in a hospital or doctor’s office. The reality is that nurses own businesses; are attorneys, manage large software companies, operate clinics and outpatient centers, etc. The beautiful benefit of being a nurse is the many, many opportunities available.

Finally, is there one piece of advice you would give to a nurse at the start of their nursing career?

Yes! Seek out the wisdom and knowledge from experienced nurses who are passionate about supporting newer nurses. We are out there – find us!

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Nursing Blog of the Month: NurseGail.com

by Tera Tuten on September 17, 2015

Recent media coverage has brought great attention to the role of nurses in our society. At the Miss America pageant held recently, Miss Colorado Kelley Johnson chose to perform a monologue about being a nurse in her talent segment. Joy Behar, host of the variety show “The View,” questioned the stethoscope around Johnson’s neck, a comment which quickly erupted in a social media storm in defense of nurses, which then spurred the #NursesUnite trending topic.

Every month in our ‘Nursing Blog of the Month’ feature, we will introduce a nursing-related blog that we enjoy reading and know you will too. We also hope that this series can help promote greater awareness, especially to those who work outside of the healthcare field, about the critical role nurses play.

Blog of the MonthGail Ingram - NurseGail.com

This month’s blogger of the month is Gail Ingram. Gail is the founder of NurseGail.com but the website is not about her.  The site, which started as Gail’s nursing business blog (which explains the name), has evolved into something much more exciting.

It is now the first health and wellness website authored solely by nurses and strives to correct misconceptions promoted by mainstream media, report the latest scientific research, and provide expert nursing opinion. NurseGail.com empowers nurses to take their health promotion to the next level and provides readers with accurate and reliable health information.

 

Tell us about your background.  What led you to nursing and how long have you been a nurse?

Nursing was ingrained in me from childhood.  Growing up, my sick grandmother and I took care of each other.  But after high school, I travelled the world and worked in fashion and media production before my nursing career.  It is the media experience combined with my BSN from UT Austin and my MS from NYU that made the growth of NurseGail.com possible.

As a registered nurse of ten years, I did everything from critical care to home care.  I thought I might teach nursing someday so I set out on a mission to try many different specialties.  I was a travel and contract nurse for over 6 years which provided opportunities for unique experiences.  Working in different areas gave me a leg up in graduate school and helps me to publish a wide variety of topics on NurseGail.com.

While at NYU, I saw that the campus health center was struggling to reach students in a meaningful way so I pitched a health column to the popular student blog, NYULocal.com.  They took a chance on me and my column developed a surprisingly large readership.  I won a prestigious peer-nominated President’s Service Award for my efforts and it gave me the boost to expand NurseGail.com.

When I’m not working on the website, I’m a primary care adult nurse practitioner making house calls in Manhattan.  I love what I do and I highly recommend that any nurse considering advanced education get started ASAP.  I wish I hadn’t waited a decade to do it.  But then again, I had to cross everything off my RN bucket list and that took some time.

 

What inspired you to start blogging?

In 2010, I started a concierge nursing service in Manhattan and along with it, I created a blog to communicate with clients and their families.   The blog took on a life of its own and, while in grad school, my goals for the site expanded.  I saw how it could reach a much wider audience with evidence-based health information, showcase the nursing profession, and become a leadership tool for nurses.

My Facebook feed gives me daily inspiration when I see “friends” sharing inaccurate health information from millennial fashion bloggers and self-proclaimed wellness “experts”.  I am motivated to engage nurses (the REAL health experts) in the e-health conversation.

 

Has anything surprised you about starting a blog?

If it is done right, starting a blog is time-consuming and becomes a barrier to sustainability and longevity for many potential nurse writers.  That is why we provide, maintain, and promote the collaborative online platform.  Nurses can focus on the writing; we take care of the rest.

Also, there is a learning curve when writing, especially for nurses.  Nurses are taught how to chart on patients which is very different from a writing style that is buzz worthy and gets a lot of hits.  We have a media advisor who created a formula for us, we have a well-established mission, and we have editors who work closely with nurses to help cultivate their voice.  All of these things combine to improve quality and shorten the trial and error period for new writers.

 

What can our readers expect to find on your blog?  And is there anything they can get involved with?

Most nursing blogs target other nurses with nursing perspectives or nursing career advice.   We are doing something very different.  We don’t turn our knowledge inward, redirecting it back into the profession.  Instead, we are showing the public what nurses know and do.

Without exposure to nurses, healthy young and middle-aged adults (who have never been hospitalized) have no idea what role nurses play in healthcare so they rely on stereotypes.  These misconceptions prevent growth of the profession and minimize the education, experience, and hard work of nurses.  The public will take a new interest in nursing and abandon old stereotypes when they find person value in us as health experts.  It isn’t enough to simply tell them how great we are—they need to see it for themselves.

At NurseGail.com we show people how smart and capable nurses are by having nurses provide readers with information about current health issues.   By doing this, the public better understands what we do, develops a personal appreciation for nurses, and ultimately the perception of the profession is enhanced.  This is in addition to cultivating nursing leadership and making the world a healthier place.

If any nurses are interested in writing with us, they can click on the “Contribute” tab at the top of the main page and send us a note.  No writing experience is necessary.

 

Is there one piece of advice you would give to a nurse at the start of their nursing career?

I encourage all nurses (new or seasoned) to practice at the top of their license.  This means being the most effective nurse possible and taking on leadership roles.  Though, it is important to keep in mind, this practice may not be rewarded with money.

Unlike other professions, money is not a marker for success in nursing.  However, there are a lot of other outside-the-box jobs for nurses in the fields of medical technology, banking, and policymaking that come with a higher paycheck.  Regardless of which direction a new nurse goes, it is my hope that they find joy and pride in their work.

 

Connect with NurseGail.com: NurseGail.com / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter / Pinterest

Get to know Gail Ingram better: Personal Statement and Bio / LinkedIn / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

 

Do you have a favorite nursing blog or run a nursing blog yourself? Nominate them or yourself to be featured in the comments below!

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Tell us about your #FirstWeekFun moments! – Twitter Contest

by Soliant Health on September 2, 2015

back to school contestHead back to school with one of two $50 Staples eGift cards by taking part in Soliant’s Back-to-School Twitter contest! [click to continue…]

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