America’s Nursing Shortage by the Numbers

by Ryan Winter on September 22, 2009

By 2020, the U.S. government predicts that it will be short between 800,000 and one million nurses. (Close to 117,000 short in California alone.)

Before that – 2015 – the U.S. Department of Health projects that 400,000 new nurses will be needed just to fill vacancies left by retirees.

soliant-nurse-shortage

supply_demand_2010_2020_nursing_shortage_america_soliantThe problems

While lucrative incentives are being offered for Americans to enter nursing college and for existing nurses to go back to school to become nursing college faculty, a longer-living, less-healthy population is already starting to weigh on the American healthcare system.

The up-side

Already strained by an out-of-control deficit of trained nurses, stressful shifts for the nurses who are holding down the fort, and – unbeknownst to many – a shortage of teachers to open-up class sizes at nursing colleges, the deal has never been sweeter for anyone with the smarts to make the grade.

The trouble spots

per_capita_state_nursing_shortage_america_soliant
Not surprisingly, Alaska has the largest nursing shortfall as a percentage of nursing positions left vacant: Beautiful as the endless summers and Northern Lights of the winter are, not every nurse wants to make the trek up to the 49th state: Only 58 percent of nursing positions there are currently filled…And a paltry 40 per cent are expected to be filled in 2015.

More surprisingly, Hawaii is also facing one of the nation’s highest vacancy rates for nursing positions. So too is Connecticut.

Overall, California is short the largest number of overall nurses: nearly 48,000 right now, a projected 81,000 in 2015 and as many as 116,600 by 2020.

Not far behind those numbers are Florida and – to a lesser extent – Georgia and New Jersey.

Flaws in the data

What’s even more troubling is that state-level data on the nursing shortage isn’t even accurate all the time: Vermont used government-gathered data to plan ahead, thought they had all the nurses they needed, and ended up with a sizable shortage (PDF).

The numbers are daunting; For example, in order to meet the projected future health care needs of the state, New Jersey needs to triple the annual number of nursing school graduates from 2000 per year to 6,000 per year.

What are the solutions?

Government studies have proposed everything from asking existing nurses to delay retirement for up to four years, increasing the number of nursing college teaching staff, and inviting more nurses from other countries to fill vacant jobs.

Projected FTE RN Supply under Alternative Wage Growth Scenarios

But perhaps most interesting option for anyone considering a career in nursing is a government study that explores the notion of raising nursing salaries nationwide an additional 1-3 per cent. Such a move would theoretically increase the number of people graduating from nursing college, though still not quite enough to meet demand.

A silver lining, if you’re interested…pay_increase_scenario_nursing_shortage_america_soliant

Thanks to upcoming recruitment and retention programs as well as a number of educational incentives, becoming a nurse in America over the next few years will likely be cheaper than is has been in a while, and working as a nurse will likely be more lucrative than its ever been.

If undecided college-bound teens are up for it, they may just find the recession-proof jobs they’ve been looking for.
(Interested in seeing what states have the highest demand? Take a look at the projected numbers below…)

State-by-state numbers:

RN supply and demand, 2010 and 2015
(Yellow highlighting denotes largest supply gaps by %
Green highlighting denotes largest overall supply gaps by number)

State

2010

2015

Supply

Demand

Supply – Demand

Supply ÷ Demand

Supply

Demand

Supply – Demand

Supply ÷
Demand

AK

3,200

5,500

-2,300

58%

2,500

6,100

-3,600

41%

AL

36,600

36,800

-200

99%

38,200

40,300

-2,100

95%

AR

19,300

22,000

-2,700

88%

19,800

24,300

-4,500

81%

AZ

30,700

43,200

-12,500

71%

30,500

48,500

-18,000

63%

CA

153,300

200,900

-47,600

76%

148,200

228,900

-80,700

65%

CO

27,200

38,100

-10,900

71%

25,100

42,500

-17,400

59%

CT

22,900

34,000

-11,100

67%

19,900

36,600

-16,700

54%

DC

6,500

9,500

-3,000

68%

5,900

10,200

-4,300

58%

DE

6,300

7,600

-1,300

83%

6,100

8,100

-2,000

75%

FL

112,000

144,700

-32,700

77%

110,200

164,300

-54,100

67%

GA

48,200

64,600

-16,400

75%

45,300

71,600

-26,300

63%

HI

7,900

12,400

-4,500

64%

8,100

13,900

-5,800

58%

IA

26,600

30,000

-3,400

89%

26,000

31,800

-5,800

82%

ID

7,400

8,200

-800

90%

7,300

9,200

-1,900

79%

IL

85,600

94,900

-9,300

90%

81,900

101,300

-19,400

81%

IN

41,600

49,800

-8,200

84%

40,400

53,500

-13,100

76%

KS

22,100

23,100

-1,000

96%

21,800

24,900

-3,100

88%

KY

34,700

33,500

1,200

104%

35,500

36,300

-800

98%

LA

37,200

37,100

100

100%

39,100

40,600

-1,500

96%

MA

60,100

76,200

-16,100

79%

56,000

81,700

-25,700

69%

MD

35,600

42,600

-7,000

84%

33,800

46,100

-12,300

73%

ME

11,600

14,100

-2,500

82%

11,100

15,300

-4,200

73%

MI

72,000

75,100

-3,100

96%

68,900

79,600

-10,700

87%

MN

41,800

46,200

-4,400

90%

41,200

50,400

-9,200

82%

MO

45,700

58,600

-12,900

78%

44,200

63,100

-18,900

70%

MS

22,600

23,100

-500

98%

23,600

25,400

-1,800

93%

MT

6,500

7,000

-500

93%

6,300

7,800

-1,500

81%

NC

67,400

75,500

-8,100

89%

68,600

83,700

-15,100

82%

ND

5,800

6,700

-900

87%

5,800

7,300

-1,500

79%

NE

14,700

17,100

-2,400

86%

14,900

18,500

-3,600

81%

NH

9,300

12,600

-3,300

74%

8,800

13,800

-5,000

64%

NJ

55,000

74,600

-19,600

74%

50,500

80,400

-29,900

63%

NM

11,000

14,100

-3,100

78%

11,300

15,900

-4,600

71%

NV

9,200

13,300

-4,100

69%

8,700

14,700

-6,000

59%

NY

142,300

163,800

-21,500

87%

137,400

174,000

-36,600

79%

OH

88,900

101,000

-12,100

88%

85,500

107,300

-21,800

80%

OK

21,500

22,000

-500

98%

22,100

24,300

-2,200

91%

OR

22,400

27,700

-5,300

81%

21,100

31,100

-10,000

68%

PA

99,200

120,300

-21,100

82%

90,600

127,200

-36,600

71%

RI

9,000

12,000

-3,000

75%

8,400

12,800

-4,400

66%

SC

25,900

31,100

-5,200

83%

26,200

34,400

-8,200

76%

SD

7,900

8,100

-200

98%

7,900

8,700

-800

91%

TN

42,800

61,300

-18,500

70%

41,800

67,800

-26,000

62%

TX

118,700

160,600

-41,900

74%

119,000

179,900

-60,900

66%

UT

14,100

15,600

-1,500

90%

14,900

17,500

-2,600

85%

VA

47,600

58,600

-11,000

81%

46,300

64,300

-18,000

72%

VT

4,800

5,400

-600

89%

4,400

5,800

-1,400

76%

WA

37,300

46,100

-8,800

81%

35,100

52,100

-17,000

67%

WI

43,300

42,800

500

101%

42,200

46,300

-4,100

91%

WV

14,600

13,900

700

105%

14,600

14,700

-100

99%

WY

3,300

4,500

-1,200

73%

3,300

5,100

-1,800

65%

U.S.a

1,941,200

2,347,000

-405,800

83%

1,886,100

2,569,800

-683,700

73%

a Due to rounding, national totals might fail to equal the sum across states.

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{ 37 comments… read them below or add one }

Neil 09.25.09 at 4:45 am

I may be uneducated in the matter, but from all the nurses I’ve talked to they say it’s damn difficult to get a job, especially in a hospital. The reason being, supposedly, are budget cuts. More accurately, the hospitals are too cheap to hire more nurses since they don’t want to pay more salaries, then overwork the staffed nurses by making them take on a more than reasonable number of patients. It’s one big capitalistic crock. And what with the “shortage of nurses” you’d think they’d make nursing school a little more affordable. My friend just graduated out of an LVN program and is now 60,000 in the hole in debt. This whole healthcare system needs some overhauling, and NOT Obama’s kind. That’s my 2 cents, up to the rest of the world to make it worth a dime.

Vasant 09.27.09 at 12:47 pm

Niel

You are indeed well informed and astute in your comment contrary to your disclaimer :-). It is another confounding aspect of US healthcare – though a significant chunk of the jobs created in the last 12 months have been in this sector, trained nurses are finding it difficult to get jobs given budget cuts. Alongside the shortage, that is bizarre but the only hope is that hiring will increase as the economy progresses and more so when there is some clarity as to the reforms.

Agnes Sax 06.08.10 at 6:48 pm

There is NO NURSING SHORTAGE!!! What does exists are RNs like myself who quit bedside nursing due to the dangerous nurse to patient ratios. I’d go back to the bedside if the ratios were reasonable…like in California. And so would hundreds of thousands of nurses just like me. The almighty dollar is more important than the lives and health of patients and nurses suffer untenable stress due to this fact. What “they” the hospital corporations want you to believe is that if there are laws that control the number of patients a nurse is assigned then they would have to close their doors for lack of enough nurses. Not so…it didn’t happen in California like the fear mongers predicted and it won’t happen anywhere else. Graduating more nurses at great cost does not solve the problem. First of all, new nurses aren’t as experienced as, lets say, I am. They need more training and make more errors. It’s like dumping in the economics of import/export. And low and behold these new nurses leave too! Oh MY!

RR 07.09.10 at 8:58 pm

Great info and charts!

I most say, however, that I am not entirely convinced that the nursing shortage still exists. And I wonder if Ryan considered the limitations of the data profiled here.

New Grad 09.20.10 at 1:10 pm

how do you expect new grad RNs to get experience if no one will hire them because they have no experience?!

Jessica 10.06.10 at 9:58 pm

More nursing staff is definitely needed. Many students are applying to nursing schools and are being rejected because there is no room for them. I will soon be applying to a nursing school that only accepts 80 out of the 3000 that apply. It is ridiculous that there is a nursing shortage when there are so many students out there who want to be nurses but are turned down even if they are qualified.

Tammey 11.27.10 at 1:17 pm

I agree with all the comments and have been considering a book which “tells the truth about the “so-called” nursing shortage. If you have further comments please send to my email tabbykk@yahoo.com and I will keep you up to date on my efforts to “paint the real picture” not the one the adminstration wants everyone to believe.

Brenda 12.22.10 at 5:08 pm

I agree with comments made above. I left the bedside due to being told I had to take more patients than is safe. It is not even just the number of patients as it is the complexity. Look at the change in the mix of patients in the hospital now compared to 20 yrs ago. Many patients that are in the hospital now would have died 20 yrs ago and the ones that walked and talked that we use to care for are out patients. Patient care is much more complex than it use to be so even if the ratios did not increase the job is much more complex now. Nurses can not refuse to take more patients when they feel they can not provide safe care for more patients. They are forced to risk their license and the safety of the patients they already care for. This makes nurses quit nursing

Owen 01.01.11 at 7:07 pm

Shortage of nurses is a bunch of crock!! I agree with the folks above this comment. “Just work the ones you already have a little bit harder” is becoming every hospitals motto. Don’t notice any shortage in the administrative dept. though. Sadly, I don’t see it getting any better. And with the “Obamacare” even worse and not enough doctors either.

Ginger 01.16.11 at 11:21 am

The downward slide in nursing began with the corporate takeover of hospitals. Work to death fewer nurses seems to be their rallying cry. This leaves a dangerous situation for nurses and patients alike. It is virtually impossible to provide adequate patient care when the RN is the nurse, secretary, aide and maid all wrapped into one. Another problem, I had was the unavailability of supplies needed for patient care. Going several flights downstairs to central supply to retrieve a bed pan totally sucks when it should be on the nursing unit. Hospitals advertise for nurses but aren’t really in the hiring mode.
Where have have all of the American doctors gone most physicians have changed to foreign born who in many cases barely speak English making it difficult to communicate with patients.
I often wonder since nurses and physician should be humane why they are opposed to all people having access to healthcare and I’m not talking about Obamacare (a real joke when it comes to healthcare.) All civilized countries in the world have some form of universal healthcare except the USA. The answer seems to be corporate greed and brainwashing of the general public. Right wing conservatives like to call it socialism but I can assure you they won’t refuse their social security checks or Medicare even if that could be socialism too. All people should have a right to healthcare whether they can afford it or not. Most jobs have experienced loss of benefits by the working class and inability to pay sky rocketing insurance premiums. It has every thing to do with dollars and sense by the hospital corporation, big drug, big insurance corporations, and physicians. Ask your congressman and senator if they have healthcare, of course, they do but they don’t care if you have it or not. The Republican party with the leadership of men like George Bush and Dick Cheney instigated corporate socialism by giving your hard earned tax money to the biggest corporations located in and outside of America without even the stipulation that it be paid back. If I want to trash the tax payer dollar I would rather give it for the purpose of providing healthcare in this country. Ask yourself, why you fall for this type of demonic propaganda. Humanity in America has gone by the wayside and the devil has moved in.

divinehandmaiden 01.25.11 at 12:51 am

Some incredibly intelligent comments! I had to contribute too. With almost 18 yrs of experience, I decided to go back to school to teach. I am an ASN but hold a bachelors as well, which makes me eligible for many of the “bridge” programs in Nusing Masters programs.
However here’s the kicker.
After extensively researching online Nusing education programs (and actually enrolling briefly in one) I found that a nusing masters program requires me to earn almost twice the credits I would need to achieve a Masters degree in other discliplines!! For example, MSN (in education or otherwise) equals aprox 50-60 credit hours as compared to an MS in education where credits between 32-39 will bestow a master’s level degree. Why? Because, the Masters in nursing program, heaps on multiple additional courses within their bachelors program onto the requirements for their Masters degree-some of which I could teach!
Multicultural nursing would be a good example. Another? Supervison in Nursing. Get this. My bachelors degree includes a 200 level and 300 level course in Supervision. The 300 level course was Women in Supervision. Neither class would qualify as a transfer credit toward Nursing in Supervison.
Can anyone tell me exactly what kind of specialized supervison nurses (in particular) need that would not be covered within these two business classes?
In my years of nursing, I have not come across the techniques specific to nurses in supervison, that are apparently not covered in mainstream supervison courses? Anyway, I’d rather complete a Masters program in another field, knowing I will have that degree in almost half the time, while using half the money to achieve it. I want to teach! Whether I’m teaching nurses or any other intelligent adults, does not matter at this point. I’d prefer Nursing, but not with the ADDITIONAL expense of time and money involved!
I even had financial aid offer a lucrative program which would pay for most of my degree, if I committed to several years of teaching at qualified schools.

Unfortunatly, I’d rather be teaching in 1-1.5 years rather than sitting thru 3 years of classes I KNOW I could have tested out of! Oh well, I guess Nursing doesn’t need teachers for their own profession, quite badly enough! Their curricula does not allow for testing out of classes that most experienced nurses could ace within the first 7 years of their careers (if not sooner!).

Robin 01.26.11 at 11:03 pm

Every shortage is real until it is not. That is true of a health care system that shorts the middle class to the point that we needed a health care bill and act that actually gave people with preconditions the hope that we can live to see whether this nursing shortage is accurate. Currently, I pay for my own monthly health care and the cost goes up every year without cease. Tack onto that the copays and every other charge they can think of to add and it doesn’t pay to go to a physician unless you are dying.

By the way, the Health Care Act would fund education for physicians who want to work in rural areas and encourages group practices that would hire more nurses. So don’t knock what you don’t understand.

All I ask for when I do finally break down and use the health care system is that the nurse or physician who sees me doesn’t see only the mega health care company that wants to pay them nothing for that service.

naughtynurse 01.27.11 at 9:53 pm

Could you please tell me where you’re obtaining your stats? I’d like more info. because I plan on moving and b/c I plan to talk my very macho husband into pursuing nursing? Numbers are great but only if they have the credibility to back them up. Thanks

kissdabreezstudentnurse 05.12.11 at 3:33 am

I think that whomever posted this article really should go back & do more homework. I’m a nursing student & all I hear about is graduate nurses having a hard time finding jobs, sometimes taking up to 8 months to a year for placement! I hope that I won’t experience the same thing when I get my RN. If you think I’m lying, go to this website called allnurses.com/generalnursingdiscussion/ & listen to all the nurses & nurse graduates give their own opinions/stories about what’s really going on!

healthcareguide4u.com 05.13.11 at 4:26 am

a longer-living, less-healthy population is already starting to weigh on the American healthcare system.

Steven Marinos 08.08.11 at 8:26 pm

Interesting posts from everyone. However, one big reason why new nurses cannot get a job, is because all the other nurses want the same job. There are plenty of work, however it requires nurses (new or old) to work off shifts, and perhaps relocate. Ususally the shortage is studied country wide, so a state that does not have a shortage, compared the neighbor state that is really in a shortage equal a shortage. The numbers do not reflect the individual states unless one looks specifically at that state’s shortage. It is true, and I agree, patient numbers is the reason why I have stopped bedside nursing. Not because of fear, but because of the inabiklity to perform my job “treat and street em” is not ny thing.

Shannon Bly 11.05.11 at 1:31 am

After paying on my nurse student loans for 10 yrs I havent even touched the principal thanks to AES locking my in to 8.25% interest rate and on top of that Erie, PA only wants to pay RN’s 17-24 dollars per hour. My mom makes more working in a shop. Very disappointing.

Anna 11.18.11 at 10:09 pm

There is NO nursing shortage in Louisiana!!! Or to be truthful, more nurses are needed but hospitals aren’t hiring. Some hospitals are staffing 1 nurse to 10 patients on the night shift. They are getting away with it and patient care is suffering. I would NEVER leave a family member alone in a hospital. They could be in rigor mortis before a nurse even had time to check on them.

Donna 11.27.11 at 3:20 pm

I just got done doing a bit of my own research for a paper I’m writing and discovered that 25% of RN’s do not work as RN’s because working conditions are so poor. RN’s leaving their nursing careers has been a major contributor to the “shortage”. In an ideal situation the “shortage” exists. Ideal means proper and safe ratios between nurses and patients which do not currently exist in most hospitals. Instead, nurses are being overworked to the detriment of patient care until many nurses can no longer take it. Within hospitals, new graduates have a quit rate within the first year of 27%. They quit in the second year at a rate of 57%. The loss of experienced nurses, in addition to the large turnover rate among new nurses, results in a substantial cost to hospitals and creates a circular failure: Operating budgets are taxed by the cost of turnovers, preventing them from hiring additional nurses, so conditions do not improve, and nurses continue to quit. Really, the reason the shortage does not seem real is because patients are not receiving the quality of care they deserve and nurses are being worked to the bone. At some point, people considering nursing are going to change their minds. And in fact, in 2011, there was a drop in nursing school applications. There is still a high demand of applicants in comparison to nursing school openings, but that is slowly changing. People are no longer willing to take out loans and rearrange their lives just for a chance of getting into nursing school. A lot of pre-nursing students have had to give up the pursuit and be stuck with worthless student loans. People are wising up to this high risk game and realizing they are not going to be scooped up into a great paying job like they have been led to believe.

CarrieRN 12.26.11 at 4:52 pm

I have been in nursing since the 90s and trust me there is no shortage of nurses. Many experienced nurses are being low censused from hospitals as the corporate way is to make nurses provide more care with less help. Some positions have a minimum of 100 highly trained nurses applying. New Grad nurses have no hope of finding a job even in a clinic or nursing home. There needs to be some honest dialog about nursing not being a recession proof profession. If you want to go to nursing school do it, but plan on working at Walmart as a cashier.

Alice Holtom 01.03.12 at 11:35 am

I have 31 years of varied experience as an RN. I have been looking for a job since March 2010. 1+1 does not equal 2 for us the 99%.

Lori 01.14.12 at 2:31 pm

Just wanted to put in my two cents. I have been an LPN for 18yrs. Loved it but the treatment you get as an LPN motivated me to go back to school. I have a little over a year before I graduate with my BSN, and it has cost me quite a lot of money. I been with the same company for 12yrs. and there is no auurance that I will have a job when I graduate, because I will not have experience as an RN. Even though they provide tution reimburment, pay me one day a week to be off to study for school, I may have to leave. But then where would I go since I would be considered a new grad. Really do you know what LPN’s were allowed to do 20yrs ago. During my recent Med surg. rotation I worked with RN’s that I make more money than currently. I told them they should come and work for the company I work for but I know that have to threaten to kill someone’s first born to get a job where I work. and they have positions open all the time. I just hope that when I graduate I will be able to stay in the department I am currently working in and not do bedside care, its too dangerous, stressfull , and demanding for me. been there done that as an LPN, now as an LPN I am lucky if I can get a set of vitals on someone.

Mary 02.28.12 at 9:27 pm

I have been a med/surg nurse for 8 years and had to leave for medical reasons. I can’t return to med/surg due to some residual short term memory loss so I am looking for some less demanding work. I am unable to find work. If there is a nursing shortage, where are all the jobs?

June 03.04.12 at 11:22 am

Yes, its true. The whole hospital staffs know there’s a shortage, but they don’t hire enough nurses to cover a good nurse to patient ratio.
Although I’ve never tried, my hospital had some incidences where a nurse had 7 pt. we try not to go over 6. But handling 6 is also tough and risky.
On top of that, my hospital recently was transformed from government to corporate. And it was announced that they will lay-off about 20% – 30%
I don’t understand. This it will likely increase errors.

But I do know few colleagues who went to Alaska, with great benefits.

Slickdickwilly 04.03.12 at 5:01 am

I can’t believe so many people are having trouble finding jobs in nursing! As a new graduate, I was practically beating potential employers away with a stick…

I think a key concept is that you need to be prepared to work where a need exists — not necessarily where you want. For example, at the hospital I work at, I heard time and time again that it was impossible to get a job there throughout school, and it was! That is, if you wanted first shift. I went for 3rd shift ER, and was hired two days after my interview.

If you’re flexible in terms of where you’re willing to live, the shift you’re willing to work, and the type of work you’re willing to do, there is no reason that you shouldn’t be able to find a job.

Toni Mangipano 04.24.12 at 8:53 pm

I am searching the states that has the greatest need for nurses. I have been an LPN for 20 years and went back and graduated as RN, ADN at the age of 52. I have been looking in area hospitals for over a year and hav’nt found anything that does’nt require RN experience. I am totally disallusioned. Today I have sent resumes to about 10 locations in the USA. I just hope something shows up, because now I have over 30,000 dollars in student loans and only a part-time job in a nursing home. What did I do? It seems like I had better employment opportunities as an LPN in the hospitals. And now, I have been experiencing ageism. Even though my house is paid for, I now must consider relocation to pursuit RN employment. Alaska here I come…hopefully.

lollE 04.25.12 at 1:02 pm

I am very worried reading all these comments. I will hopefully have my rn degree in 3-4 years and wondering if I made the right choice. I am worried I won’t find a job!! I would relocate, etc.. Any advice?

MiMi Idlewild 07.24.12 at 4:24 pm

Unless nurses pull together nationally to form a union style organization that pushes national law reform, then it won’t get better. If ratios were nationally instituted for patient safety then the hospitals would have to respond. If nothing else, it could push TJC to create standards for it. Jeopardizing accreditation may be the only way to go.

Loraine 09.13.12 at 5:46 pm

In 1979, LPN’s were used in hopitals at half the rate of pay as an RN. After 33 years in the hospital setting. All the LPN’s in the entire hospital were let go (had been employed for 21 years with the same hospital) maybe LPN/LVN’s should be utilized again.

Angie 10.30.12 at 1:00 pm

I really like the idea of nurses forming a national union. That is probably the only way to get things to change on a corporate and national level. The risk for errors increases when nurses are assigned too many patients to provide adequate care for. This puts the company at risk for lawsuits, so how are they saving money by cutting back on nursing staff? I have not worked in a hospital setting, but I have over 6 years experience in a long-term care skilled nursing facility. The company that I used to work for had many patients that by all means should have stayed in the hospital for a few more days for their condition to stabilize, but were discharged to our facility because their insurance would not allow them to stay in the hospital any longer, and all to often these patients had to be transfered to the emergency room within the 1st 24 hours of their stay with us. We were basically a med surg unit, however our facility was technically classified as a nursing home, therefore was staffed as such. There were many times when only 2 nurses (LPNs, not RNs) were working a unit with 45-50 patients . This was on all shifts, not just nights. And asking management for assistance is a joke! Their 2 hour lunches are too important for that, yet the floor staff are lucky if they even get a 10 minute break, much less a 30 minute lunch. This is a very dangerous situation for the patients as well as nurses, because the facilitly to which I am refering does not have there employees’ backs if something unfortunate does happen, as I am sure this is probably the case with 99% of all the facilities out there. Something definitely needs to be done to change things for the sake of the patients and their care providers!

Susann 12.03.12 at 12:14 pm

I’m ASN and relocated from NM to OR as I saw how well the jobs pay. In NM I wouldn’t work at local hospital they were assigning nurses a patient load comprised of patients from floor two AND floor three. Seriously!!!! The local hospital was bought up to larger corporation. Wages frozen for all staff for past three years except for CEO who gets $500,000 bonus annually….. Insane! Local long term care facility gave me 60 patients q shift. I think the economy has more nurses taking more shifts as primary breadwinner, and I dont think there IS a nursing shortage anymore (see Bloomberg article) However, due to Magnet status craze I can’t find a job here as most RN positions require BSN. I am now looking at LVN jobs, can you believe it? I just want to make enough money to get home……

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Robert James 06.13.13 at 11:13 pm

I think, this article is being paid by the nursing schools because, Im an RN here in California, but I can not find a job even in skilled nursing facilities. When you talked to other nurses, we have the same situations. Maybe I can tell you a little about this, the other week, I was reading a Sunday newspaper; San Jose Mercury. They have a half page article about how nurses will be in short dire supply in many fields. Interesting? Not really! At the bottom page there is an add about a saint school of nursing, elaborating how they can help you achieved degree in nursing. Just think about it, how many new nurses right now does not have a job and in debt?
So maybe there is something fishy going on here. Just do thorough assessment and maybe this is just marketing for the schools so that they can make more money while we suffer and dreaming like we are taking risperdal.

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krist 08.22.13 at 8:58 am

I’ll present a sense of logic behind this post. True, there may not be a shortage in the amount of licensed nurses/registered nurses. There is a shortage in the amount of skilled nurses to perform in certain areas of dire need. There will continuously be a shortage of nurses if you examine the qualifications of new grads. Most new graduates will find a home in nursing, but not in the desired practice. There will be a shortage in patients, but as more individuals view the healthcare field as recession proof, we have less reimbursement coming in the healthcare facilities. Thus, this presents the problem that nurses are not needed or can not be afforded.
A lot of tenured nurses build this scare tactic of there is a nursing shortage-there isn’t a nursing shortage, based on their economic or employable standards. Colleges are producing more graduates in broad fields from law to arts. This means, whatever field you choose to work in there will be those who are unemployable and those who will be able to secure positions.

Is there a nursing shortage technically? No. Is there a need for additional nurses nationwide? Of course. The labor field works off of statistical predictions ,not current necessity. The nursing shortage is based off of a 15 year retirement rate, which is bound to be adjusted if the recession is proven to be our new economy!

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marysharon 03.30.14 at 4:51 pm

Iam currently an LPN SINCE 1999 I AGREE WITH ALL writers here I also agree wholeheartly about corporate greed out there in nursing Iam sick of corprates hireing teckie people to do my job just to save money what happened to lets think about the patient and not just the bottom line Iam currently waiting to get into the nursing program to finish for my associates degree I cannot wait maybe then I can try to make more of a difference

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