Trends in Travel Nursing Jobs for 2013

by Tera Tuten on August 14, 2012

Travel Nursing Trends

The healthcare industry is booming, even in today’s lackluster economy. For a traveling RN, this means more opportunities for employment. Travel RN Gab says, “The demand for travel nursing jobs is on the rise. Health reform has resulted in 32 million more people having access to health care. The aging population is living longer, which requires more health services including home health care, dialysis, and hospice services.” A surplus of baby boomers in the warmer states and coastlines gives ample opportunity for a traveling RN to secure employment without having to worry about the harsher weather seen in states where snow is prevalent.

The best part about traveling RN jobs is that they change with the seasons, allowing you to see events and cities you might not otherwise have been able to experience. Hawaii has surfing and its resulting industry, Colorado needs RNs to tend to its injured skiers, snowboarders, and cross country trekkers, and someone interested in historical locations might be apt to visit Boston, Philadelphia, Metro DC, or even a Virginia suburb such as Gettysburg. Overall, the hiring trend for RNs will lead to a wealth of opportunities for those that are willing to take them. Figure out where you want to travel to, and conduct a search for what kind of travel nursing jobs are available in the area. Overall, the choice is yours whether to travel or not. Be sure to weigh the pros and cons before making any decision.

Travel RN employment, and the healthcare field in general, is always in high demand. Making sure you are getting the best match for your skills is important. If your particular job isn’t matching up, or you aren’t feeling challenged enough, perhaps consider taking a new job in a new area. The health and nursing field is competitive, so be aware that many others may have the same (or better!) credentials, and be prepared to tell a potential long distance employer why you want the position and are qualified over other applicants. Brush up on your resume writing skills, or even public speaking. As an RN, talking to people is a way to calm their fears, connect with patients, and calm stressed or upset family members. Being able to step into a role to provide information, even if you aren’t local to the area, is important.

Even in today’s bleak economy, the RN hiring trend has continued to climb since 2010, and jobs are easier to find than ever before. Signing up with a travel nursing agency is a surefire way to find a secure job in a new area. Be sure to get your affairs in order before traveling to a new place, such as finding a place to live, moving out of your old place – or renting it out while you’re gone, if you live alone and can sublet. Some travel nursing agencies can help with that! If you have family, do you have tips for how to survive as a traveling RN despite the pressures of family obligations and perhaps being away for weeks or months at a time? What are some challenges you face as a traveling nurse trying to acclimate to new staff, new management, and a new area?

 

 

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{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

TERRE.SUZANNE SIMONS, CST 09.05.12 at 11:56 pm

This is a great article. It also applies to Certified Surgical Techs.

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Carole Deering 09.11.12 at 10:16 pm

Does this also include registered dietitians/nutritionists?

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Tera Tuten 09.20.12 at 1:18 pm

Hi Carole – no, our facts only include Registered Nurses.

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HellooooRN 10.09.12 at 10:07 am

I am so glad that the job security of travel nursing is improving. Having been a traveler for five years, I have experiencesd “feast and famine” times. By the way, Gettysburg is in Pa, not Va, LOL!

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